I recently came across a Youtube tutorial which explained how to spot viral e-commerce videos on Facebook. 

It won’t tell you what’s the next eco-friendly piece of premium apparel but it will give you a few – sometimes surprising – ideas which might inspire your own e-commerce ventures.

Bear in mind that most of these videos have been (heavily) advertised by their creators, with some free uplift via further organic shares.

Simply type FREE SHIPPING goo.gl or FREE SHIPPING bit.ly in Facebook’s search bar and then select VIDEOS for the post format.

The reason why we add goo.gl / bit.ly to FREE SHIPPING is that we want to retrieve posts featuring a shortened URL, which will also give us an indication about the engagement of the video, beyond the view count. This can give us a rough idea of the advertisers’ ROI.

spot viral e-commerce videos on Facebook

Here’s an example of a video which has accumulated more than 1.4 million views, 5K+ reactions and 1.7K+ shares. Not too bad.

If you copy one of the shortened URLs and add a “+” (https://goo.gl/CmTR8H+), you’ll get the amount of clicks received by the URL. In this case, not that much, 678 when I wrote this piece (June 26, 2018). Not a profitable campaign.

viral e-commerce videos Facebook

Let’s take another one.

10+M views, 32K+ reactions, 3K+ comments, 4.8K+ shares.

Here the quick analysis of the shortened URL (http://goo.gl/YPvNDK+) gives us 17K+ clicks (FYI, the final destination of the URL doesn’t exist anymore). Which has probably generated c. 170 direct sales (1% conversion).

It’s difficult to know exactly how much the advertiser spent on FB for this sponsored post (since we have almost 5K organic shares). But let’s assume that he bought 100K views out of the 10M, at $0.02 per view, it would amount to $2,000, the equivalent of $11.7 per sale. Since the destination of the URL is now offline (and since I can’t be sure of the advertising budget), I don’t have any idea of the retail price. So I can’t confirm whether the campaign was profitable or not but it definitely generated some interest / sales.

Let’s examine a last one, feat a bit.ly URL.

Almost 38,000 clicks on https://bitly.com/2DUlI4t (check https://bitly.com/2DUlI4t+) as I’m writing these lines! At 1% conversion rate (it could be higher), it gives us 380 sales. Let’s say 500 sales after cart abandonment retargeting. At $12 each, it means $6,000 in sales.

The video hasn’t generated that many shares compared to the previous ones (207), so the advertiser has probably spent money to generate a big proportion of the views. Let’s say 200,000 views at $0,02 each = $4,000. A quick search on AliExpress shows similar items at c. $4. If we add $2 for shipping, it leaves $6 to the seller, so $3000 in profit margin for 500 items.

To know whether the campaign was profitable, we should have the exact ad spend (vs organic uplift), but it gives us a rough idea about the results. Bear in mind that most online sellers usually sell some items at a loss or with a tiny profit to try to generate further “back end” sales in a long-term funnel (through email automation, retargeting,…).

Have fun looking for e-commerce inspiration on Facebook 😉

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